There’s nothing grey about grey mullet!

Tue 29th August 2017
Cj Jackson770X600

A fresh ‘stiff alive’ grey mullet is a handsome fish that rivals sea bass in appearance, with bright silver scales, grey back with no obvious lateral line and black beady eyes. It has a flat snake like head and once you have tackled the scaling filleting and pin-boning: the resulting fillets are full flavoured and flaky in texture. 

709Ec4745382325D51D20F2Cdc4B87E8

Give this grey mullet and bacon roll a try. It's so easy to make

Mullet is in top condition at this time of the year and there is plenty on sale at Billingsgate! It is a common fish and is highly commercial in many countries, generally caught in the wild: it is also cultivated in Southeast Asia. 

E71C7A067B0F37954Eb409E7C60F2F0F

Another great Fish is the Dish recipe is our grey mullet with  lemon and almond crust.

There are a number of different species caught in salt and fresh water around the globe and it is generally fished near the shore. It is found in the Atlantic, Pacific and the Indian Oceans.

Historically it is cooked whole or in fillets and once the scales have been removed – as skin on fillets. The skin protects the fillets during cooking and under the grill will go toasty brown and crisp. 

Grey Mullet 055 770X600

Or if you're a foodie, push the boat out with this spectacular dish!

The roe from mullet was dried (sometimes smoked) and traditionally used in the classic – Taramasalata – today it is more likely to be smoked cods roe – as it is less expensive. The dried roe is sold dipped in beeswax and is quite a delicacy spread on crackers or toast. In some countries the fish is sold dried and salted.

It suits many methods of cooking, pan-frying, baked and grilled. Flavour wise the fillets of grey mullet can be herbaceous and earthy in flavour. If this is a concern the fish can be soaked in water with a generous squeeze of lemon.  Flavours that work particularly well with this fish include citrus dressings, gentle Moroccan spices including Ras el Hanout, garlic and chilli – which love many fish!

CJ Jackson